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In the News

  • Keen to be healthier in old age? Tend your inner garden

    The Conversation – 29 January 2016

    The “very old” do spark our interest – but is our search for a secret to longevity actually misguided? Wouldn’t you rather live healthier than live longer in poor health? Surely, what we really want to know is how do we live well in old age.

    Click Here to view the article.

  • More than 11 moles on your arm could indicate higher risk of melanoma

    King’s College London – 19 October 2015

    Researchers at King’s College London have investigated a new method that could be used by GPs to quickly determine the number of moles on the entire body by counting the number found on a smaller ‘proxy’ body area, such as an arm.

    Click Here to view the article.

  • Why is my hangover so bad?

    The Guardian – 21 June 2015

    Tim Spector talks to the Guardian about how drinking alcohol affects our microbial population and in return the intensity of hangovers.

    Click Here to view the article.

  • Explainer – What is twin research?

    The Conversation – 9 May 2014

    An article that provides an overview of the department and our involvement with Hugo and Ross Turner’s Greenland Trek.

    Click Here to view the article.

  • Twin research & pain sensitivity

    BBC Radio 4 – 20 February 2014

    Inside Science visited the Department of Twin Research at King’s, where Professor Tim Spector showed them the latest developments in twin research and epigenetics, including a recent study on pain sensitivity.

    Click Here to listen to the broadcast
    Item begins at 16.05.

  • Sins of the fathers and the mothers

    The Sydney Morning Herald – 20th January 2014

    How day-to-day choices can affect your DNA

    Epigenetics takes place where nature meets nurture, where the environment interacts with our genes, creating a new type of soft inheritance, a kind of short-lived adaptation to our life circumstances.

    Read the full article HERE.

  • Identically Different – Can we change our genes?

    Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) – 2nd December 2013

    Professor of Genetic Epidemiology, Tim Spector combines his scientific knowledge and research to answer this question, and many more, in his new book.

    Tim Spector argues that we are not just skin and bones controlled by genes but minds and bodies made of plastic, and this plastic is dynamic, slowly changing shape and evolving, and nothing is completely genetically hard-wired or pre-ordained.

    Click Here to listen to the broadcast

  • Why are identical twins often so different?

    Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) – 28th November 2013

    The founder of one of the world’s largest twin registries is arguing that, contrary to public opinion, our lives are not necessarily determined by our genes.

    He says his research on twins shows nothing is completely hard-wired.

    Click Here to listen to the broadcast

  • Recognition for Epigenetics

    Theconversation.com 9th October 2013

    Tim Spector writes: Adrian Bird, Howard Cedar and Aharon Razin were hotly tipped to win this year’s Nobel Prize for Medicine for their pioneering work in the field of epigenetics. They didn’t win. But their nomination is a triumph for an area of science too often dismissed as a phenomenon and a landmark in our small field’s history.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • 21 Years of Twin Research

    Radio New Zealand 29th June 2013

    For the past 21 years Professor Tim Spector and researchers at the Department of Twin Research have been studying 3,500 pairs of twins worldwide. From the “This Way Up” programme on 29 Jun 2013

    To listen to the programme, please click here

  • Seeing double:hundreds of twin flock to garden party celebrating 21st Anniversary

    The Mail on Sunday 9th June 2013

    Around 375 sets of twins attended event at London’s St Thomas’ Hospital. It marks 21st anniversary of study by the Department of Twin Research. Scientists have discovered 400 novel genes associated with over 30 diseases

    To read the full article, please click here

  • El discipulo renegado de Darwin: “El futuro no esta en los genes, nos equivocamos”

    El Confidencial 7th June 2013

    El profesor de genética epidemiológica Tim Spector es director del registro británico de gemelos e investigador del King´s College de Londres.

    To read the full article, please click  here

  • Why do identical twins end up having different lives?

    The Observer 2nd June 2013

    Their genes are exactly the same, so why don’t identical siblings’ lives follow more similar patterns?

    To read the full article, please click here

  • The Age of Epigenetics

    Project Syndicate 10th January 2013

    LONDON – Fifty-one years ago, James Watson, Maurice Wilkins, and Francis Crick were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their discovery of DNA’s structure – a breakthrough that heralded the age of the gene

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Epigenetics: promising field delivers

    Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News 2nd January 2013

    The fascination with epigenetics stems not only from the profound impact that it has exerted on the biomedical, medical, and social sciences, but also from the somewhat debated and elusive definition of the term itself. It’s shifted multiple times over the years.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Why seeing double is always twice the fun?

    The Independent on Sunday 28th October 2012

    As a Lincolnshire school aims for the record books with the number of twins on roll, Joanna Moorhead considers our delight at the sight of matching siblings.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Gene flaw linked to low back pain

    BBC News Health 21st September 2012

    Scientists have identified a gene flaw linked to disc problems that are a common cause of lower back pain.

    To read the full article, please click here

     

  • Identically different: Why you can change your genes by Tim Spector- Review

    The Guardian 20th August 2012

    The Olympic Isle on opening night was “full of noises, / Sounds, and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not”. The lion of the industrial revolution could lie down with the lamb. But beneath the fantasy a sewer ran, diverted but untamed: the spectre of doping. And not just doping, because this is the age of genomics: gene doping.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Identical twins show the malleability of our genes

    New Scientist 20th June 2012

    “AN APPLE, cleft in two, is not more twin than these two creatures.” This line, from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, plays on the similarities between (supposedly) identical twins for comic effect.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Nature, nurture… or neither? Epigenetics is the new twist in an age-old argument

    The Independent 1st June 2012

    A combination of genes and our environment makes us what we are. Or so we always thought…

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Breakthrough announced in ageing genes study

    The Independent 20th April 2012

    Four “Father Time” genes that help determine how fast we age have been uncovered by scientists.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Uncovering the secrets of a sprightly old age

    BBC Radio 4 Today Programme 30th December 2011

    Despite undergoing open-heart surgery two years ago, our guest editor Baroness Boothroyd is, at the age of 82, “in fine fettle” – something that those who meet her often comment on. But why is that?

    To listen to the programme, please click here

  • Master switch controls your body fat

    The Daily Mirror 16th May 2011

    A GENE inherited from mums control whether their kids will be fat, scientists found. The gene, linked to type 2 diabetes, affects the ­behaviour of other genes found in fat in the body and helps to manage weight.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Scientists find “master switch” gene for obesity

    Reuters 15th May 2011

    Scientists have found that a gene linked to diabetes and cholesterol is a “master switch” that controls other genes found in fat in the body, and say it should help in the search for treatments for obesity-related diseases.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • We’ve found the gene that makes you fat, claim scientists studying obesity

    The daily Mail 15th May 2011

    The ‘master switch’ gene which causes obesity has been identified, scientists have claimed.

    The DNA is thought to be what controls other genes found in the body’s fat cells.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Found: Genes that hold the secret of longer life

    The Daily Express 15th April 2011

    Scientists have found eight genes that could help us to live longer, healthier lives.

    To view the full article please click here.

  • Genes could hold the key to a long and healthy life

    The Telegraph 15th April 2011

    The researchers have pinpointed eight genetic variations that control the production of a crucial hormone which is linked to old age as well as diseases of the elderly.

    To view the full article please click here.

  • Stop, rewind: the scientists slowing the ageing process

    BBC News (Science & Environment) 26th January 2011

    Scientists are slowly unlocking the secrets of ageing, and some suggest treatments may soon be at hand to slow or even reverse the ageing process.

  • Why wealthy women are programmed to live longer

    Daily Mail (Mail on Sunday) 23rd January 2011

    Take a close look at the picture on the right – it holds the key to your entire future. The spongey ‘worms’, which have been coloured green, are examples of the body’s X and Y chromosomes – whiles the red caps are telomeres.

  • ‘Baby-faced’ people live longer

    BBC News 15th December 2010

    People blessed with youthful faces are more likely to live to a ripe old age than those who look more than their years, work shows. Danish scientists say appearance alone can predict survival, after they studied 387 pairs of twins.

  • Is this the end of ageing? How we can hold back the years

    The Mail on Sunday 28th November 2010

    There are, it seems, medical breakthroughs nearly every week to help us combat one of the harsh facts of life: ageing.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Genes give clue to early puberty

    BBC News Health 22nd November 2010

    At least 30 genes appear to play a role in the age at which girls reach puberty, according to an international group of scientists.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Puberty linked to body fat

    News in Science 22nd November 2010

    An international team of researchers have identified 30 genes connected to the onset of periods in women, some of which regulate body weight and fat metabolism.

  • Genes link puberty timing and body fat in women

    King’s College London 22nd November 2010

    Researchers at King’s College London’s Department of Twin Research have discovered, as part of a large international consortium, 30 new genes that control the age of sexual maturation in women, the Journal Nature Genetics publishes today.

  • Genes give clue to early puberty

    BBC News (Health) 21st November 2010

    At least 30 genes appear to play a role in the age at which girls reach puberty, according to an international group of scientists.

  • Oh you little beauties – moles keep ageing at bay

    The Sunday Times 21st November 2010

    British scientists have discovered that people with lots of moles are genetically protected from many of the ravages of time.

  • Scientists spot genes tied to puberty, body fat in girls

    Bloomsberg Business Week 21st November 2010

    Scientists have pinpointed 30 genes that control the timing of puberty in females. They also believe many of these genes also play a role in body weight regulation or fat metabolism.

  • Could glasses soon be history?

    BBC News On line 14th September 2010

    Scientists have identified a gene that causes short-sightedness, a discovery which paves the way for treatment to prevent one of the world’s most common eye disorders. So could this mean the end of spectacles?

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Found, genes that could save millions from short-sight and lead to a drug to combat condition

    The Daily Mail 13th September 2010

    Children would no longer be at risk of complications of short-sightedness which could cause blindness. But more research is  needed and any drug to prevent condition is at least 15 years away.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Genetic code linked to short sight found

    The Guardian 13th September 2010

    Scientists’ discovery raises the prospect of developing drugs in the future to prevent failing vision.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Found, the gene that causes short-sight

    Daily Mail 13th September 2010

    A gene that causes short-sightedness has been pin-pointed by British scientists, paving the way for eye drops that could make glasses history.

  • Genes for Myopia discovered

    King’s College London (News highlights) 13th September 2010

    Researchers from the Department of Twin Research at King’s College London have identified genes associated with tow common eye problems, myopia and glaucoma. The findings have been published in this week’s edition of Nature Genetics.

  • Gene link may see end of short-sightedness

    The Daily Telegraph 13th September 2010

    Short-sightedness could be consigned to history after scientists identified a collection of genes linked to the condition.

  • Genes for short-sight discovered

    The Guardian 13th September 2010

    Scientists have discovered strands of genetic code liked to short sight, the most common eye disorder in the world.

  • Largest-ever epigenetic study launched

    The Great Beyond (nature.com) 08th September 2010

    A hugely ambitious study of epigenetic effects in identical twins was launched today, the largest of its kind to date. The Epitwin Project is collaboration between TwinsUK, a research group based at King’s College London, and BGI, the Chinese DNA sequencing powerhouse in Shenzhen.

  • Largest ever Epigenetics project launched

    King’s College London 07th September 2010

    One of the most ambitious large-scale projects in Human Genetics has been launched today: Epitwin will capture the subtle epigenetic signatures that mark the differences between 5,000 twins on a scale and depth never before attempted, providing key therapeutic targets for the development of drug treatments.

  • Genes linked to Vitamin Deficiency

    Montreal Gazette 12th June 2010

    An international study co-authored by McGill University researcher Brent Richards explains why sunshine and certain foods aren’t always enough to ward off a Vitamin d deficiency.

  • Genes may be a source of Vitamin D deficiency

    Bloomsberg Businessweek 10th June 2010

    Nutrition and sun exposure are both primes influences on an individual’s vitamin D level, but a new study suggests that genetics could help determine a person’s risk for vitamin D deficiency.

  • Vitamin D deficiency linked to genetic polymorphisms

    Scientific American 10th June 2010

    At least half of adults in developed countries have deficient levels of vitamin D, and low levels of this vitamin have been linked to bone fragility, cancer, heart disease and immune system problems.

  • A big nose could stop you getting hay fever. An ample derriere may ward off diabetes… Why your ugly bits are good for you

    Mail on Sunday (Mail Online) 03rd June 2010

    For scientists have shown a big nose offers greater protection against colds and flu. Here, from a big bottom to flat feet, we reveal why the body parts you hate might be doing you a favour…

  • Three new genetic loci have been identified with involvement in subtle and quantitative variation of human eye colour

    7thSpace (7thSpace Interactive) 09th May 2010

    Previous studies on the genetics of human eye colour used broadly categorized trait information such as ‘blue’, ‘green’, and ‘brown’; however, variation in eye colour exists in a continuous grading from the lightest blue to the darkest brown.

  • Potential new test for early diagnosis of osteoarthritis identified

    King’s College London (Press Release) 22nd April 2010

    Researchers at King’s College London’s Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, based at St Thomas’ Hospital have discovered new ways of measuring biological markers in the blood which could be used to diagnose osteoarthritis earlier.

  • Genes reveal ‘biological ageing’

    BBC News On line 10th February 2010

    Gene variants that might show how fast people’s bodies are actually ageing have been pinpointed by scientists.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Genes reveal ‘biological ageing’

    BBC News 10th February 2010

    Gene variants that might show how fast people’s bodies are actually ageing have been pinpointed by scientists.

  • Looking young for your age? Thank the Peter Pan gene

    The Daily Mail 9th February 2010

    Scientists have found a ‘Peter Pan gene’ that could explain why some people remain baby-faced while others become old before their time.

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Identificadas las primeras variantes genéticas relacionadas con el envejecimiento

    El Mundo 8th February 2010

    El hallazgo mejora la comprensión de las enfermedades relacionadas con la edad

    To read the full article, please click here

  • Looking young for your age? Thank the Peter Pan gene

    Daily Mail (Mail Online) 08th February 2010

    Scientists have found a ‘Peter Pan gene’ that could explain why some people remain baby-faced while others become old before their time.

  • Genetic variant linked to biological ageing

    King’s College London 08th February 2010

    Scientists from King’s and the University of Leicester have for the first time identified definitive variants associated with biological ageing in humans. The discovery has important implications for the understanding of cancer and age associated diseases.

  • First gene variant linked to ageing identified

    Wellcome Trust 08th February 2010

    Scientists have identified the first definitive genetic variants associated with biological ageing in humans. Their study suggests that some people may be genetically programmed to age at a faster rate when exposed to environmental factors such as smoking, obesity or lack of exercise.

  • Living fast? Scientists show lifespan is linked to DNA

    The Guardian (guardian.co.uk) 07th February 2010

    Scientists have isolated a gene sequence that appears to determine how fast our bodies age, the first time a link between DNA and human lifespan has been found.

  • Genetic test for ageing may soon be possible

    The Independent 07th February 2010

    A genetic test for how quickly a person will age over the course of a lifetime may soon be possible following a study that has for the first time definitively identified DNA variations in the population that can be linked with biological ageing.

  • New research snub of G spot leaves many hot and bothered

    The Washington Post 30th January 2010

    A student of European culture might conclude that the international G-spot debate of 2010 could be condensed to Ooh la la vs. Close your eyes and think of England.

  • Does ‘G’ mark the spot?

    Toronto Sun 13th January 2010

    It’s been debated for half a century, yet no one can quite agree on the supposedly magical, nickel-sized female pleasure zone called the G-spot.

  • Finding the G-spot: Is it real?

    CNN.com 11th January 2010

    Women everywhere have read or heard that they may possess a secret pleasure zone inside their bodies that, is stimulated correctly, yields intense pleasure and even orgasm. But this so-called G-spot has never been precisely identified as a concrete biological entity. Scientists are still arguing over what it is and whether it exists at all.

  • The real G-spot myth

    Guardian 05th January 2010

    According to new research carried by scientists at King’s College, London, the mysterious G-spot, the sexual pleasure zone said to be possessed by some women but denied to others, like Atlantis, is a myth.

  • Study suggests G Spot is a myth

    Daily Star 04th January 2010

    It’s the news lazy fellas have been waiting for – the G Spot does not exist. Scientists say the mysterious erogenous zone, said to make women orgasm, is a myth.

  • The G-spot ‘is a fantasy’: That elusive erogenous zone doesn’t exist, say researchers

    Daily Mail (Mail Online) 04th January 2010

    You can call off the search, chaps – the G-spot may not exist after all. Researchers who studied 1,800 women have found no evidence of the female erogenous zone.

  • The G-spot and other myths about sex

    The Independent 4th January 2010

    No sex please, we’re British. As tight-lipped as the average person is about discussing sex, there are loads of rumours about the act – probably stemming from the playground – which seemed to have worked their way in the mainstream.

  • G-spot ‘doesn’t appear to exist’

    BBC News 04th January 2010

    The elusive erogenous zone said to exist in some women may be a myth, say researchers who have hunted for it.

  • Scientists cast doubt on whether G-spot exists

    Belfast telegraph 04th January 2010

    A new scientific study has cast doubt on whether the erogenous G-spot zone in women actually exists.

  • Sexy G-spot a myth

    New York Post 04th January 2010

    Scientists say new research shows that the G-spot — the reputed hot zone for women’s intense orgasms – simply doesn’t exist.

  • G-spot a myth, claim scientists

    The Times of India 04th January 2010

    After years of bedroom exploration and debate, a row about the location of the fabled G-spot might be finally over – but in vain.

  • What an anti-climax: G-spot is a myth

    The Sunday Times 03rd January 2010

    A study by British scientists has found that the mysterious G-spot, the sexual pleasure zone said to be possessed by some women but denied to others, may not exist at all.

  • New lung function genes discovered

    King’s College London (News Archive 2009) 17th December 2009

    Scientists in the Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology Unit at King’s working with 96 scientists from 63 centres in Europe and Australia have identified five common genetic variations which affect lung function.

  • Bone drug rationing leaves women at risk as many osteoporosis victims ‘will go untreated’

    Daily Mail (Mail Online) 08th December 2009

    Women with osteoporosis face being banned from getting drugs which tackle their condition unless their bones are dangerously thin. GPs will be allowed to order £300-a-year Protelos only for patients whose condition has ‘deteriorated’ – even though the cost of treating a broken hip is estimated at £25,300 a year

  • The Secret Life of Twins

    The Metro 1st October 2009

    There’s something about twins that exerts a peculiar hold on the popular imagination. Maybe it’s just that most of us can’t get over how spooky it would be to look into a human mirror but the concept of identical twins does hold a kind of freaky fascination.

  • The Secret Life of Twins

    The Times 1st October 2009

    In the second part of this enlightening series, the identical twin doctors Chris and Xand van Tulleken visit two mass gatherings of twins in London and Ohio, where they have a unique chance to meet hundreds of pairs of identical and non-identical twins and find out how dissimilar they really are.

  • The Secret Life of Twins

    The Independent 1st October 2009

    I’ve had problems before with Chris and Xander, two male doctors who first popped up on Channel 4 in a series called Medicine Men and are now fronting up The Secret Life of Twins, a BBC1 series about what we can learn about nature versus nurture from biology’s very own buy-one-get-one-free offer.

  • The Secret Life of Twins

    King’s College London 30th September 2009

    Earlier this year the unit celebrated their development of the twins database with a Summer Twin Party in July. The BBC filmed this event for the twins documentary The Secret Life of Twins and the programmes will air tonight and tomorrow at 9pm on BBC One.

  • The Secret Life of Twins

    Mirror.co.uk 30th September 2009

    Science loves twins because they help pinpoint which characteristics we’re born with and which are shaped by our environment.

  • Why am I the short fat one?

    BBC News 30th September 2009

    My identical twin brother Chris is 2cm taller than me. Barely noticeable you would think. I can see what it is like to be him by standing on tip-toes just a little and frankly the world does not look much different from up there. Nonetheless it bothers me: I could have been that tall. I have exactly the same genes as my brother.

  • Twins party held at St Thomas’ features on BBC documentary

    Guy’s and St Thomas’ 29th September 2009

    The Summer Twin Party hosted by the Twin Research Unit at King’s College London, based at St Thomas’ Hospital, celebrated their development of the twins database. The BBC filmed the event for the ‘The Secret Life of Twins’, a documentary to be aired on BBC on Wednesday 30 September and Thursday 1 October at 9 pm.

  • They’re identical twins… so why is it that one of them will age 10 years before the other?

    Mail on Sunday (Mail Online) 26th September 2009

    They look alike, think alike, sometimes even dress alike. Identical twins may make up just half a per cent of the world’s population but their uniqueness is proving to be more than just skin-deep.

  • Twinning Streak

    The Independent 02nd September 2009

    Before they divided into separate embryos, Bob and Mike Bryan existed, briefly, as a single zygote. Thirty-one years later, the identical twins have become the greatest doubles pair of their generation.

  • Secrets of our genes

    South of The River (Health news and advice from Guy’s and St Thomas’) Autumn 2009

    Have you always hated eating your greens, even though they’re good for you? Do you love coffee? Adore garlic in cooking? Doctors and scientists at King’s College London’s twin research department based at St Thomas’ think our food likes and dislikes may be hardwired in us.

  • Is more sun the answer to low vitamin D?

    Wellcome Trust 13th August 2009

    A study of Caucasian female twins prompts researchers to ask if public health advice to avoid sun could be causing low vitamin D levels. Research produced by the Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King’s College London, has shown that vitamin D levels are lower in fair-skinned Caucasian women than in Caucasian women with darker skin types.

  • Sun exposure cancer warning ‘lead to Vitamin D deficiencies’

    Telegraph.co.uk 09th August 2009

    Public health warnings about skin cancer have led to a rise in Vitamin D deficiency through, lack of sunlight, according to a controversial study into the effects of ultraviolet exposure.

  • Sun warning ‘overstated’ as science finds new clue to skin cancer

    The Times (Times Online) 12th July 2009

    Sunshine is not the main cause of the most dangerous form of skin cancer, according to researchers, who say some warnings about the perils of sunbathing are scarring people unnecessarily.

  • Moles hold the key to melanoma genes

    King’s College London 05th July 2009

    A research team led by the Twin Research Department, at King’s College London with colleagues from Imperial College London, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Brisbane and Leeds has found novel genes for melanoma in one of several studies to be published today in Nature Genetics.

  • Hundreds of twins descend on St Thomas’ Hospital

    LondonSE1 (Community Website) 05th July 2009

    Several hundred twins from across Britain and a few abroad attended a garden party at St Thomas’ Hospital on Saturday. The Twin Summer Party was hosted by King’s College London’s Department of Twin Research. Big Ben across the river provided a backdrop for photographs.

  • Vitamin D ‘Key to Healthy Brain’

    BBC News 21st May 2009

    Scientists have produced more evidence that vitamin D has an important role in keeping the brain in good working order in later life.

  • Menopause gene prevents cancer

    The Times of India 18th May 2009

    London: Scientists have found new gene variant linked with the age at which females experience menstrual period and the onset of menopause, which can even help in preventing breast and endometrial cancer, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease.

  • Gene set sexual clock in women: Study

    The Hindu News Update Service 18th May 2009

    London (PTI): For long, scientists have debated why some women go through puberty and menopause early or late. Now, a new study has uncovered the ‘first genetic evidence ‘ to explain differences in the length of their fertile lives.

  • Genetic link between period onset and BMI

    ABC News 18th May 2009

    A large group of studies have found genetic links between body mass index and the onset of menarche.

  • Newly found genes linked with menopause could prevent cancer, heart disease

    Yahoo News India 18th May 2009

    Scientists have found new gene variants linked with the age at which females experience menstrual period and the onset of menopause, which can even help in preventing breast and endometrial cancer, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease.

  • Novel genes found for menarche and menopause

    Science Centric 17th May 2009

    Genes controlling menopause and menarche have been identified in two studies by UK twin researchers at the Department of Twin Research, King’s College London and published today in Nature Genetics.

  • Women’s menstruation genes found

    BBC News 17th May 2009

    Scientists say they have begun to crack the genetic code that helps determine when a girl becomes a woman.

  • Emotional intelligence ‘aids sex’

    BBC News 17th May 2009

    Women who are more ‘emotionally intelligent’ get greater pleasure from sex, research on twins suggest.

  • Smarter girls have far better sex lives

    The Sun 12th May 2009

    Women with brains have more fun in bed than the average bimbo, scientists found.

  • Women with high emotional intelligence ‘have more fun in bed’

    Sindh Today 12th May 2009

    Women with high emotional intelligence (EI) have better sex lives, according to a new study.